Friday Finds: The Best of Learning, Design & Technology | April 9, 2020

“Change the way you look at things and the things you look at change.”

Wayne W. Dyer

Happy Friday! This week I got my 2nd vaccination shot and I’m very happily counting down the 12 days it takes for that to fully kick in. I’m grateful that Ohio seems to be ahead of many other places in getting these shots into people’s arms. I’m very much looking forward to reconnecting with people in person (smartly) again the physical contact of friendly fist bumps and hugs. (Consider yourself warned!)

Thanks for reading!

What I’m Listening to: I made a “Good Days” playlist to capture my optimistic mood I’m in this week.


Last week’s most clicked item:
5 Ways to Create Visual Hierarchy


10 Principles for Healthy Communities

Meg Wheatly shares 10 principles for making a community healthy. She answers questions like What allows a community to thrive in the long-term? How can it regenerate and sustain over time? and more.

https://medium.com/together-institute/10-principles-for-healthy-communities-by-meg-wheatley-6466fe1d070d


Decoding the no-code / low-code universe

10 years ago, most web and application designs on the internet used to depend on developers, who had to work day and night to make their code work. Fast-forward to today, and anyone with a computer and access to the internet can build a website, app or internal tool using extremely powerful applications: no-code & low-code tools. Dig into this round up of 145 unique companies and 12 categories of no-code goodness.

https://pinver.medium.com/decoding-the-no-code-low-code-startup-universe-and-its-players-4b5e0221d58b


A Neuroscientist’s Poignant Study of How We Forget Most Things in Life

Lisa Genova explains that a healthy brain quickly forgets most of what passes into conscious awareness (and how that is a good thing). The fragments of experience that do get encoded into long-term memory are then subject to “creative editing.”

https://www.newyorker.com/recommends/read/a-neuroscientists-poignant-study-of-how-we-forget-most-things-in-life


Changing Your Mind Can Make You Less Anxious

Humans are programmed to think we’re right at all costs. Fighting that instinct will set you free.This article shares some relevant research about how humility relates to happiness and life satisfaction along with four strategies you might want to add to try out for yourself.

https://www.theatlantic.com/family/archive/2021/03/to-get-happier-admit-when-youre-wrong/618245/


Everything You Need to Know to Create Quizzes With Microsoft Forms

From the basics to branching and more, Richard Byrne has you covered when it comes to creating quizzes with Microsoft Forms.

https://practicaledtech.com/2021/04/04/everything-you-need-to-know-to-create-quizzes-with-microsoft-forms/


A few other things just because I can.

Podcasts

Here are three podcast episodes from this week that are worth a listen:


Tools, Tips & Resources

I also publish a daily L&D Tech Toolbox newsletter. You can find those and subscribe here.

  • Finding.Email – Over 500 newsletters on a wide variety of subjects are organized into sections like a big Sunday newspaper.
  • Reading.Email – Reading.email lets more people read more newsletters more often.
  • MovieOfTheNight – Handy way to search for good movies on multiple streaming services & save them to watch later
  • Camo – use your iPhone as a webcam
  • BackgroundCut – another nice option for removing image backgrounds

Where You Can Find Me


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Looking for a previous edition? Check out the archives

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