Friday Find Finds — Skills Reports, Async Training Program & Brain Sensory Signals

“Your job is to collect good ideas. The more good ideas you collect, the more you can choose from to be influenced by.”

Austin Kleon

Happy Friday! I’m excited that I’ll be doing not one, but two full-day workshops this fall at DevLearn. I’ll be teaming up with Bianca Baumann to bring back our “Using the Marketing Playbook to Score Better L&D Results” workshop for one. And the second one will be “Breaking the Code Barrier: Making Your L&D Ideas Reality with NoCode Tools” with Mathias Vermeulen. Of course, I’m biased but I think they are both going to be great experiences.

Thanks for reading

What I’m Listening to:  I’m eagerly awaiting the next season of Ted Lasso and not only is it the best TV show ever, the music is pretty darn good too.

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Last week’s most clicked item:
The Complete Guide to Memory


Insights from five major reports on the skills obsession

It’s hard to find an organization these days that does not have a hard time finding or keeping good people with the right skills. People quitting, new roles needed and fewer applicants. That’s why, for the last year or two, the learniverse has become somewhat obsessed with skills-related topics; the skills gap, re- and upskilling, skills development, skills-based approaches, etc.

https://www.anewspring.com/insights-from-five-major-reports-on-the-skills-obsession/

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How do Learning Styles Affect Learning Predictions?

In spite of many cognitive psychologists’ efforts to dispel the myth, the learning styles theory is still popular in many educational circles. Yet again, the researchers found that catering to learning styles does not improve  learning, and can be harmful.

https://www.learningscientists.org/blog/2022/5/12-1

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How the Brain Tells Apart Important and Unimportant Sensations

Recent research at Northwestern University, the University of Chicago and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, Calif., has discovered that a small, largely ignored structure at the very bottom of the brain stem plays a critical role in the brain’s selection of sensory signals. The area is called the cuneate nucleus, or CN. This research on the CN changes the scientific understanding of sensory processing,

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-the-brain-tells-apart-important-and-unimportant-sensations

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How Buffer Offers Async Training To Their Fully-Distributed Team

Jump in and learn how Buffer took a chance to explore new asynchronous training ideas for their remote team. Learn what they did, how they encouraged participation and some of the lessons they learned..

https://buffer.com/resources/async-training-customer-advocacy-team/

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How to create impactful workshops (every single time)

Jan Keck says that there is a magical question that you HAVE TO answer before you start designing your workshops, meetings and experiences if you want them to be impactful. He shares his step-by-step process to get clear on the PURPOSE of your next gathering, which will make EVERY SINGLE DECISION in your experience design process easier.

Watch Video

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  • Erase.bg is one of the better online background removal tools I’ve seen
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  • Spacers is a fun set of 3D illustrations
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  • Reasonable Colors is an open-source color system for building accessible, nice-looking color palettes.
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  • Quick Tools is an online suite of tools for converting documents, editing images and videos and more.
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  • Claap is a tool for async video collaboration for hybrid teams like video voicemail.

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And should you come across anything interesting this week, send it my way! I always love finding new things to read or watch.


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Published by Mike Taylor

Born with a life-long passion for learning, I have the great fortune to work at the intersection of learning, design, technology & collaboration.

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